Tag Archives: Bible Study

Together For Preaching

St. Peter Preaching 06.jpg

St. Peter Preaching 06.jpg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

SERMON NOTES–Pastor Mike Berry
December 9, 2012–Cornerstone Fellowship Bible Church

The following notes were taken from a sermon that was part of our CFBC Winter Seminar: Together for the Gospel.

THE VALUE OF GATHERING TOGETHER FOR THE PREACHED WORD OF GOD

Preaching is the pinnacle of worship.

Preliminaries:
-preaching is a positive thing (the word “preach” often has a negative connotation)
-preaching is a heralding of Scripture, lifting up of God and the Gospel

We need to hear God’s Word preached, together.
-This is an irreducibly complex proposition. You cannot remove any part of it and still have it be true.
-This is a need, not an option.

1. We need God.
-We have been made to have a relationship with God.
-Ps. 42:1-2 (like the Psalmist, my soul pants for God, my soul thirsts for God).

2. We need God’s Word.
-If it were not for God revealing Himself to us through His Word, we would be lost.
-He reveals Himself in love through His Word.
-John 6:68, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life.”

3. We need to hear God’s Word.
-Hear=Listen with the attitude that it will impact our wills.
-Rom. 10:17, So faith comes by hearing, and hearing through the word of Christ.

4. We need to hear God’s Word preached.
-Not just by ordained ministers.
-The preaching of God’s Word is sacramental, a means of Grace.
-Rom. 1:15-16, for I am not ashamed of the Gospel…
-The preaching of the Gospel is even for saved people.
-Eph. 4:11; 2:20
-If the Gospel is being preached, we are to be thankful.
-1 Tim. 5:17-18
-Preaching is not just something that happens after worship. Preaching is worship.

5. We need to hear God’s Word preached together.
-Something special happens when God’s people gather together.
-In the New Testament, we are the temple of God and He is pleased to manifest His presence when God’s people gather to hear the preached Word.
-Acts 2:41-44
-The body grows together under the preaching of God’s Word.
-The preaching of God’s Word is not mere giving and receiving of information. It is worship.
-If we don’t gather=modern Protestant Monasticism

Questions:

What if we don’t gather together to hear God’s Word preached?
-We are despising a gift of Jesus.
-We grow at different rates.

How can we take advantage of the preacher?
-Like physical exercise:
Stretch out before the preaching: prepare beforehand.
Exercise yourself during the sermon: active listening, fight to pay attention, understanding this is a spiritual activity.
Warm down after the sermon: process the sermon and talk about the message with others, i.e. Care Group.
Continue the burn: take whatever you learn and work with it.

What if the preacher isn’t Milton Vincent (or your favorite pastor, or well-known preacher, etc.).
-If the Gospel is being faithfully preached, it should not matter.

What if the preacher is wrong?
-Understand that humans have frailties.
-Compare what the preacher says to Scripture.
-Get further clarification/feedback from preacher.
-Talk to your pastor if need be.

“The mature worshiper is easily edified.”


A Good Victory

Sermon notes – Pastor Milton Vincent – Cornerstone Fellowship Bible Church
May 9, 2010, Mother’s Day

For more information or to download sermons, please visit Cornerstone Fellowship Bible Church website at www.cornerstonebible.org.

A note from Terrie: These are my notes taken during our church service on Sunday mornings. I will do my best to represent each sermon faithfully and post by Wednesday evening. Please keep in mind that these notes are just that, notes, and are a condensed version of the sermon. My prayer is that not only will these posts help me to think about God’s Word and how to apply it to my life, but that each post will encourage others to do the same.

Six Observations About Eunice’s Child-Rearing Victory with Her Son, Timothy

I am reminded of your sincere faith, a faith that dwelt first in your grand-mother Lois and your mother Eunice and now, I am sure, dwells in you as well. (2 Tim 1:5)

Look at Timothy’s Mother, Eunice, and be encouraged.
The name Eunice: Prefix EU can be translated “Good” (Koine Greek); NICE (as in Nike) can be translated “Victory”

EU + NICE = GOOD VICTORY

1.  Eunice experienced many challenges (obstacles) in raising Timothy for God.
    
-She was in a racially mixed marriage (Acts 16:1). Eunice was a Jewish believer and married to a Gentile. It is likely that the couple was never really quite accepted by either circle, Jew or Gentile.
     -She probably did not have her parents’ permission and blessing to marry a Gentile. This could indicate that she was not in a good place, spiritually speaking, when she first married.
     -Being married to a non-Jew, it would have been difficult to teach her son the Judaeo ethic.
     -Her husband was unsaved. She had to raise her son alone in regard to Christianity.
     -The city where Eunice lived was utterly pagan (Acts 14:11-19).
     -The Jews in the region where she lived were hostile towards Christianity (Acts 16:3).
     -It is likely that Timothy was a timid and sickly child (2 Tim 1:7-8; 1 Tim 5:23).
     -Also, like all of us, her son had a sin problem, and so did she (Ps. 51:5; Prov. 22:15). Indwelling sin worked against her being a good mother.

2.  Eunice experienced victory in raising Timothy for God.
     
-Timothy was young and a disciple (Acts 16:1).
     -Timothy was well spoken of by other believers(Acts 16:2)
     -Paul wanted Timothy to travel with him as a missionary (Acts 16:3).
     -Timothy was willing to step out of his comfort zone for the cause of Christ. Timothy knew that Paul had a history of facing many dangers and getting into trouble and yet he still agreed to partner with Paul in ministry. He also allowed Paul to circumcise him (Acts 16:3).
     -Timothy became one of Paul’s closest and beloved associates in ministry.
     -Timothy became a pastor and an evangelist (I Tim 1:3; 2 Tim 4:5).
     -Timothy was willing to suffer for Christ (Heb. 13:23).

3.  Eunice contributed to this victory by modeling for Timothy a sincere faith in Christ (2 Tim 1:5).
     
-She believed Christ.
     -She had a sincere faith (non-hypocritical).
     -She trusted Christ.

4.  Eunice contributed to this victory by teaching Timothy the Scriptures (2 Tim 3:14-15).

5.  Eunice contributed to this victory by making use of the help of others.
    
-“Knowing from whom you learned it” (2 Tim 3:14)… The “whom” here is plural signifying that Timothy not only learned from his mother but from others as well. Eunice’s husband was not a believer so she must have taken advantage of the help of others when it came to teaching her son the Scriptures.

6.  Eunice contributed to this victory by releasing Timothy to serve the cause of Christ.
    
-Even though she knew there was pain and danger involved, Eunice allowed her son the freedom to serve Christ.

Eunice gave her faith to her son, then gave her son to the faith.


     

    


Taking Care of Widows – I Timothy 5:3-8

Sermon notes – Pastor Milton Vincent – Cornerstone Fellowship Bible Church
January 17, 2010

For more information or to download sermons, please visit Cornerstone Fellowship Bible Church website at www.cornerstonebible.org.

A note from Terrie: These are my notes taken during our church service on Sunday mornings. I will do my best to represent each sermon faithfully and post by Wednesday evening. Please keep in mind that these notes are just that, notes, and are a condensed version of the sermon. My prayer is that not only will these posts help me to think about God’s Word and how to apply it to my life, but that each post will encourage others to do the same.

Five things God would want from a church regarding widows:

1.  He would want the church to teach on widows (verse 7).
In times past, widows were especially vulnerable. Because of that, God pays special attention to widows and warns that He will judge those who afflict them. (See: Deut. 14:28,29; 24:19; Ps. 146:9; 68:5.)

2.  He would want the church to know the difference between a “widow” and a “widow indeed”.
There is a broad category, “widows”, and a smaller sub-set who are “widows indeed” (verse 3).
A “widow indeed” is someone who:

  1. has lost her husband
  2. is truly destitute (that is, has no children or grand-children of her own, verse 4)
  3. has been left alone (verse 5)
  4. is a Christian (hopes in God, verse 5)
  5. is Godly (verse 5; 2:1)

At that time, it could be that the church was providing care for widows who were not saved or even widows who were prostitutes. These women were taking advantage of God’s people and were not to be considered “widows indeed” (verse 6).

3.  He would want the church to discern which of these categories each widow fits into.

4.  He would want the church to assume responsibility for taking care of widows who are “widows indeed”.
The church is to respect, care for, provide assistance to, and take on the burden and responsibility of caring for “widows indeed”.
Verse 3 reads: “Honor widows who are really widows.” The word, honor, is in the present tense. This would mean continuously providing ongoing care for them. Of course, we are to take care of all widows, generally speaking, but ongoing care is reserved for “widows indeed”.

5.  He would want the church to instruct the members to take care of the widows in their own families (verse 4).
How could a church correctly frame this admonition to take care of the “widows indeed” (or, even assist other family members who might be unable to care for themselves)?

Six Motivations:

A.  To do so is Godliness! Taking the responsibility to care for those who are unable to care for themselves is what Godliness looks like (verse 4). This might entail helping with decision-making, physical needs, spiritual needs, financial help, or shepherding a loved one through the dieing process.

B. It’s a payback! It’s an opportunity to repay your parents for everything they have done for you (verse 4). Think of the daily provision your parents have given you day after day, year after year, in all areas of life. It’s your time to return a portion of their love and sacrifice back to them. A note to the young people: Start now! Practice love, gratitude and service towards your parents.

C.  It’s worship! According to verse 4, caring for your parents when they are unable to care for themselves is “good and acceptable before God.” This is the language of worship, and it is an act of sacrificial worship before God. When you invest yourself in others, your service is acceptable, or warmly received, or gladly welcomed by God. Doing so is not just a horizontal, but a vertical transaction as well. For example, in Philippians 4:17-18, Paul calls the offering he receives from his brothers and sisters not only a blessing to him, but “a sweet-smelling aroma, an acceptable sacrifice, well pleasing to God.” 

D.  It is a good testimony! The word “they” in verse 7 refers to the children or grandchildren mentioned in verse 4. Obeying God in this matter is part of being above reproach.

E.  To not do this is to deny the Gospel! To refuse to care for “your own” is to deny “the faith” (verse 8). The words, “the faith”, are a synonym for the Gospel. And what does this have to do with the Gospel? A central part of the Gospel is that Jesus fulfilled the law. This includes the fifth commandment, to honor your mother and father. As He was growing up, Jesus perfectly obeyed this commandment. Jesus obeyed His Father when He gave Himself up to be crucified for our sins. Even in the agony of His final hour, Jesus speaks to his mother from the cross and shows love and honor towards her:

When Jesus therefore saw His mother and the disciple whom He loved standing by, He said to His mother, “Woman, behold your son!” Then He said to the disciple, “Behold your mother!” And from that hour that disciple took her to his own home. -John 19:26-27

F.  To not provide care makes you worse than non-Christians! Even non-believers and pagans cared for their parents (verse 8). In fact, under Greek law, anyone who failed to do so had their civil rights revoked.

In conclusion, consider caring for family members who cannot care for themselves as an opportunity to obey God and to fulfill the claim Christ has put on our lives through the Gospel.

 


Some Resolutions for 2010 from Ezra 7:6-10

Sermon notes – Pastor Milton Vincent – Cornerstone Fellowship Bible Church
January 3, 2010

For more information or to download sermons, please visit Cornerstone Fellowship Bible Church website at www.cornerstonebible.org.

A note from Terrie: These are my notes taken during our church service on Sunday mornings. I will do my best to represent each sermon faithfully and post by Wednesday evening. Please keep in mind that these notes are just that, notes, and are a condensed version of the sermon. My prayer is that not only will these posts help me to think about God’s Word and how to apply it to my life, but that each post will encourage others to do the same.

Three Resolutions that will put us in the position to experience, as Ezra did, the good hand of God upon our lives.

Ezra and 1700 of his fellow Jews were given the opportunity to return to Jerusalem in order to revive the practices of the Jewish people after being in Babylonian captivity for 70 years.

Ezra returned to Jerusalem to:
1. Teach the law
2. Appoint leaders
3. Reinstate the system of sacrifices
4. Beautify the Temple

Ezra asks the king for permission to go to Jerusalem and the king “granted him all his request, according to the hand of the Lord his God upon him.” (Ezra 7:6b). Ezra’s journey was long and difficult. It took him four months to travel 900 miles. Ezra was successful in his journey and “he came to Jerusalem, according to the good hand of God upon him.” (Ezra 7:9).

Why was the good hand of God upon Ezra? The writer provides the explanation in verse 10:

1. Because Ezra resolved to study the Word of God.
Ezra determined to study, seek, consult, inquire, and investigate what God’s Word had to say about all areas of his life. Ezra made God’s word his authority. He was “a skilled scribe in the Law of Moses” (verse 6). Like Ezra, we should also be quick to go to God’s Word. We make many unexamined choices. Do we think through His Lordship in ALL areas of our lives?

2. Because Ezra resolved to practice the Word of God.
Ezra was not content just to fatten his brain, but he put God’s Word into practice. Ezra was willing to obey God even if he did not know exactly what the Lord might ask of him. Ezra surrendered his will to God’s will.  He didn’t just study and then decide if he wanted to obey. He studied with obedience in mind.

Can we pray, “Lord, I don’t know what you will have for me in 2010, but whatever it is, I will obey!” (Also, see I Samuel 3:10 and John 7:17.) God speaks to those who will listen and obey. If you come to God’s Word with an obedient heart, God will speak to you.

3. Because Ezra resolved to teach the Word of God.
Ezra love people enough to teach them. He also loved God and desired to honor Him by teaching others. James 3:1 informs us that not many should become teachers, but the teachers in that instance are teachers with a “capital T”, or those who are called to teach in an official capacity. Not everyone is called to be a teacher with a “capital T”. But, we are all called to teach. Believers should be teaching one another (See Matt. 28:20; Eph. 6:4; Deut. 11:18-19; Col. 3:16; Heb. 5:12).

Think about this. Ezra had only a small portion of the Bible available to Him as God’s Word and yet, he studied and was skilled in what he did have. We have both the Old and New Testaments. The Messiah has been made known to us. Ezra would be amazed that we don’t take advantage of the revelation that God has given us in the Scripture.

Resolve to be an expert in God’s Word. Resolve to apply the principle of obedience to the study of God’s Word. Resolve to embrace the calling to teach.

IMPORTANT: We are not saying that if you do these things, you will earn God’s good hand upon your life. But, if you do these things, you will surely put yourself in the position to receive it.

 


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